Angry residents say 40-foot-tall building blocks views

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Point Loma residents say they are outraged by a new four-story building that was approved without any input from their area planning board or any notice to people in the neighborhood.

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SAN DIEGO -- Point Loma residents met Monday night to strategize about stopping a construction project they say will block bay views established decades ago.

The residents said they are outraged by a new four-story building that was approved without any input from their area planning board or any notice to people in the neighborhood.

"This is something that's been decided down in City Hall in back rooms. Now, if this is allowed, you can imagine what they are going to do with the stadium downtown," resident Gary Wasserman told FOX 5.

Residents watched with interest as the structure grew to three stories, but their reaction turned to outrage when the developer pushed on to a fourth story.

“We need to stop this building project before the entire block gets redeveloped and blocks everyone’s views,” said John Linney, chairman of the Point Loma Planning Board.

Hundreds of neighbors gathered together Monday night to plan a protest against the project. The building is going up just outside the planning board's jurisdiction, and residents say they are furious that they were not notified by the city about the project and had no say in the decision to approve it.

“No one told me anything -- not one word from the city,” said Celina Motta Mac a long-time resident. Representatives of the developer, the Pacific Enterprise Corp., say they are complying with the existing law and keeping construction within the 40-foot height limit. But area resident argue that Proposition D limits homes and buildings in the area to 30 feet.

"It's amazing how a neighbor right across the street would have to come through (the planning board) if they want to rebuild a kitchen or rebuild a bathroom,"  Linney said. "But for something this big, it doesn't come through us. That's more than frustrating -- it's upsetting. It's going to ruin Roseville."

Linney and others who oppose the  project have a scheduled a meeting with  Mayor Kevin Faulconer for Wednesday. Faulconer has said that he sympathizes with residents but doesn't know if he can legally do anything to impose a lower height limit.

Linney said that if nothing comes of the meeting with the mayor, his group will hire a lawyer and file a lawsuit to stop the project.

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