SAN DIEGO – The California State Legislature approved a resolution last week that encourages communities to end cruising bans and recognizes the cultural significance of cruising in the Golden State.

ACR-176, titled “Cruising,” received bipartisan support and is creating a movement in the lowrider community.

Although the resolution does not hold legal weight, it does “encourage local officials and law enforcement to work with local car clubs to conduct safe cruising events.”

“Cruising is part of our culture,” Jovita Arellano, co-chair of the United Lowrider Coalition, said.

Arellano said the ordinances banning cruising, such as the one in National City, is “discriminatory.”

Arellano and those in the United Lowrider Coalition hope this resolution can help break the stigma.

“We take three cars let’s say a Mercedes and a Honda and we cruise down Highland, no one is going to look at us twice, we go in these cars, all eyes on us,” said Carlos Ruiz who is part of the lowrider community.

The coalition is hoping the resolution recently passed by the state will urge National City leaders to take down these signs on Highland Avenue and allow cruising once again.

“The last 30 years of not being able to cruise down Highland Avenue is really really hard for us,” Arellano said.

In May, National City brought back cruising for the first time in 30 years after the city banned it in 1992 over concerns of crime and traffic, but the Friday night event did not return for the final planned cruise nights because organizers were told they would have to pay thousands of dollars for police security.

The United Lowrider Coalition is partnering with Love Thy Neighbor movement on August 27th to host a clean-up event and free block party at Montgomery Waller Community Park, which will feature about 150 lowriders, live music, art, events for kids and more.

No announcement has been made from National City leaders since the passage of this resolution Thursday.