Hollywood exec sued by babysitter in wage spat

Entertainment
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 10: Founder and CEO of Relativity Media Ryan Kavanaugh speaks onstage at the 8th Annual HEAVEN Gala presented by Art of Elysium and Samsung Galaxy at Hangar 8 on January 10, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Art of Elysium)

LOS ANGELES, CA – JANUARY 10: Founder and CEO of Relativity Media Ryan Kavanaugh speaks onstage at the 8th Annual HEAVEN Gala presented by Art of Elysium and Samsung Galaxy at Hangar 8 on January 10, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Art of Elysium)

Correction: A previous version of this story misstated Ryan Kavanaugh’s title. He is the founder and former CEO of Relativity Media.

LOS ANGELES (CNS) – A Hollywood producer and financier is being sued by a former babysitter for his newborn child who alleges she is owed more than $175,000 after he abruptly fired her in 2020 only two months into her 13-month contract.

Maureen Russell’s Los Angeles Superior Court lawsuit allegations against Ryan Kavanaugh include breach of a written employment contract, breach of the covenant of good faith and fair dealing, failure to pay overtime wages and failure to furnish accurate wage statements. She seeks unspecified damages in the suit filed Tuesday.

A representative for Kavanaugh, 46, could not be immediately reached for comment.

Russell and her business, Serenity Placement Agency, were hired by Kavanaugh to provide care to his newborn child last May, the suit states. The two initially had a verbal agreement, but Russell later asked for a written contract in order to protect herself, the suit states.

Kavanaugh balked at first, but later concurred and the two reached a written deal on June 28 for her to babysit for the child 12 hours a day, four days a week from June 26 until Sept. 26, 2020 and 24 hours daily from Sept. 27, 2020 through July 27, 2021 — all at $40 an hour, according to the suit.

However, Kavanaugh abruptly fired Russell last July 17, citing “child custody issues,” the suit states.

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