Police: Man shoots girlfriend in head, says she was in car accident

FULTON COUNTY, Ga. – A Georgia man reportedly shot his ex-girlfriend and tried to cover it up, saying she had been in a car accident. Now, he’s facing charges.

A woman and her ex-boyfriend were arguing in her car two years ago when her driver’s side window shattered and she blacked out.

When she regained consciousness, she was in his car; they were on their way to his mother’s house because she had a head wound.

She thought she had been cut by flying glass. But her ex, Jerrontae Cain, had a secret – he had shot her.

Thursday, a judge sentenced Cain, 39, to 25 years in prison for several crimes including aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and possession of a firearm by a felon. Cain had been convicted of felony sexual battery in 2010.

For a month after the shooting in 2017, the woman stayed at Cain’s mother’s house, suffering through severe headaches, dealing with memory loss and having trouble speaking, according to a news release from the Fulton County District Attorney’s office. In June that year, a friend took her to the hospital.

Doctors at Atlanta Medical Center found a bullet in the back of her skull, one that would have to remain there because trying to take it out could kill her, the DA’s office said.

Hospital staff alerted investigators, and the woman told them she didn’t remember being shot – she just recalled the window breaking.

Cain told police the woman, now 42, had crashed her car into a tree. But detectives found the crime scene inconsistent with his explanation, according to the DA’s office.

They issued an arrest warrant but Cain was not caught until January 2019, more than a year later, when police showed up at a home in College Park, just south of Atlanta. He hid in an attic during a two-hour standoff until he surrendered, the DA’s office said.

Cain was also sentenced to five years of probation to be served after his prison term.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.