Quick-thinking trio pulls man from ledge of Coronado Bridge

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SAN DIEGO -- A group of Good Samaritans are being praised for saving a young man from possibly taking his life Monday night.

Charlies Crehore, Aidan Leavitt and Jerry Nutter told FOX 5 they were driving home when someone caught Leavitt's eye on the Coronado Bridge.

“I looked over and saw a kid sitting on the ledge. I told Charles and luckily Charles just reacted right away,” Leavitt said.

Crehore said he threw his car in reverse as Nutter called 911.

“In that split second we all kind of developed our job,” Nutter said.

When they got to the young man, Leavitt said he jumped out, grabbed him and got him in the car. The group noticed he was carrying a phone in a plastic bag and seemed depressed. They said he hardly said anything as they drove him to the hospital, where they were met by officers and the man's family.

“That’s when it really got serious, they came up crying to us, saying, 'Thanks for saving me and my son,'” Leavitt said.

“The fact that we potentially saved somebody’s life is just insane,” Nutter said.

The men are grateful that they were in the right place at the right time.

“God, I mean He sent us there,” Leavitt said.

Since they do not know the young man's name, the trio has not been able to reach out to him or his family, but they hope they get this message: “Prayers go out to his family. Hopefully everything works out,” Leavitt said.

“Yeah, hugs to the family and to the guy, too. For any reason, if he should see this I hope he gets the help he needs and works through this and just realizes that this life, no matter how gray it gets it’s always worth living,” Crehore said.

Since the bridge opened in 1969, more than 400 people have ended their lives by jumping from it.

Caltrans has held several meetings to discuss putting suicide prevention barriers along the bridge and has released a report outlining several prototypes. 

If you or someone you know needs help, the suicide crisis hotline number is 888-724-7240.

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