Trump, Sanders win New Hampshire primary

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Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire primary races.

CONCORD, N.H. – Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night, according to a CNN projection.

One week after placing second in the Iowa Republican caucuses, Donald Trump placed first in New Hampshire. He had been far ahead in public opinion polls leading up to the contest, but the win is particularly important as a test for the billionaire’s unconventional campaign style. He had been ahead in polls in Iowa as well. The race for second in New Hampshire could determine which candidate emerges as a chief rival to Trump in the months ahead.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich finished second behind winner Trump, according to a CNN projection.

The win was expected for Sanders, a senator from neighboring state Vermont who had been ahead in public opinion polls. But it could nonetheless give Democrats further pause about former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. The victory for the self-described democratic socialist also robs Clinton of victory in a state she won during the 2008 presidential primary and which gave her husband momentum on his way to the White House in 1992.

Clinton called Sanders to concede the New Hampshire Democratic primary. Her campaign argued the election will be won in March, not February, and an aide said her loss was “the biggest of wake up calls.”

Exit poll results from the New Hampshire primary showed deep discontent with the Republican Party and the federal government, and the candidate who railed hardest on those topics, Donald Trump, won with multiple groups of voters.

Trump won New Hampshire’s primary by carrying a range of demographic and ideological groups with more than 30% of the vote. He topped the rest of the field among both men and women, voters under age 64, voters without a college degree, and those who have a college degree but no postgraduate study.

He won among conservatives and moderates, first-time voters and those who’ve voted before and registered Republicans and those who are undeclared.

Trump won 6-in-10 voters who said they were looking for an outside candidate.

But New Hampshire also exposed a weakness for Trump: late-deciding voters, who made up almost half the Republican vote, broke evenly between Trump and Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

Kasich won the battle for second place with the support of late-deciders and voters who said they wanted a candidate with experience.

 

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