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Special Mayoral Election

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Alvarez Adds 19 Business Advisors To CampaignSAN DIEGO — Councilman David Alvarez was hit with a $2,000 fine this week by the city’s Ethics Commission for mayoral campaign mailers that did not properly disclose the funding source.

The city’s campaign rules include guidelines intended to make it clear who paid for publicity items.

According to an agreement between Alvarez and the commission, the “paid for by” disclosure on a mailer distributed to 47,000 homes on Oct. 21 did not contrast sufficiently with the background to be legible.

The words cannot be seen on an example of the mailer published on the commission’s website.

The agreement also states that on Nov. 13, the campaign produced a postcard in which the required statement was in 8-point type, instead of a 12- point print required by the commission.

The company that produced the documents, Mission Control Inc., has agreed to pay part of the fine, according to the agreement.

According to the commission, Alvarez relied on Mission Control to produce the campaign literature, suspended its distribution when the mistake was discovered and was cooperative.

“As the stipulation documents state, we worked productively with the Ethics Commission and the issue is resolved,” said Alvarez campaign spokesman Stephen Heverly.

He said Mission Control will pay $1,500 of the fine and Alvarez will pay $500.

Alvarez was defeated by fellow Councilman Kevin Faulconer by a 54.4 to 45.6 percent margin in Tuesday’s mayoral runoff election.

SAN DIEGO — Mayor-elect Kevin Faulconer Friday introduced a 29-member committee that will help him make the transition from councilman to head of San Diego’s municipal government.

Faulconer Transition TeamFaulconer defeated fellow Councilman David Alvarez, 54.4 to 45.6 percent, in Tuesday’s runoff election. He is expected to be inaugurated on March 3.

The committee, which will meet weekly over the next two months, will be co-chaired by Steve Cushman, vice chairman of the San Diego Convention Center Corp. Board of Directors, and former councilman Tony Young, who is now CEO of the San Diego and Imperial counties chapter of the American Red Cross.

“You represent the best of San Diego,” Faulconer told committee members at a news conference. “You’re here because you believe in this city.”

The group is named the “One San Diego Transition Advisory Committee” because it contains representatives from every community, he said.

Among the members are homeless advocate Father Joe Carroll, retired Navy Rear Adm. Ronne Froman, retired Cox Communications General Manager Bill Geppert, architecture and design firm principal Vince Mudd and longtime LGBT activist Nicole Murray-Ramirez.

Also on the team is Michael Zucchet, a former councilman and now head of the San Diego Municipal Employees Association. Public employee unions strongly backed Alvarez during the election campaign.

Zucchet said Faulconer has shown an ability to put politics aside in the past and work for solutions to city problems.

“This is a great start; of course the proof will be in the pudding and the substance of the issues facing San Diego for the next couple of years,” Zucchet said. “I’m very optimistic and I wouldn’t be willing to be a part of this if I didn’t think Kevin was looking for solutions instead of reliving a campaign.”

The committee will help organize Faulconer’s administration and open lines of communication with interested parties, like city employees, but won’t get into the details of contract negotiations or the mayor-elect’s desire to resume bidding-out city functions, Zucchet said.

The committee roster also includes Brian Marvel, who heads the San Diego Police Officers Association, three members of the clergy, leaders of the Asian and black business communities and teacher Blanca Lopez Brown.

 

SAN DIEGO — Mayor-elect Kevin Faulconer will meet with interim Mayor Todd Gloria Wednesday evening to begin discussing the transition at City Hall.

Faulconer GloriaFaulconer, 46, who is expected to take the oath of office on March 3, will serve the nearly three years remaining in disgraced ex-Mayor Bob Filner’s term.

With all 582 precincts reporting, Faulconer had 137,296 votes, or 54.5 percent of the total, compared to 114,478 votes, or 45.8 percent for his opponent, David Alvarez, according to results released by the San Diego County Registrar of Voters.

About 36,000 mail-in ballots had yet to be counted as of late Tuesday.

Though the race is nonpartisan, Faulconer is Republican, the only one among mayors of the nation’s 10 most populous cities.

Faulconer said he would continue fiscal reforms instituted by Jerry Sanders, Filner’s predecessor, and plow the savings back into the city’s neighborhoods.

Faulconer, who is married and has two school-aged children, will give up his District 2 City Council seat when he is inaugurated, which will reduce the Republican minority from 5-4 to 5-3 on the technically nonpartisan body.

His replacement will be appointed by the City Council, and Gloria said last week a Democrat would be considered. Such an appointee would give the Democrats a veto-proof 6-3 edge.

SAN DIEGO — San Diego voters elected Kevin Faulconer as their new mayor by a comfortable margin Tuesday

Mayor Kevin FaulconerGET REAL-TIME ELECTION RESULTS NOW!

With 100 percent of the vote counted, Faulconer had 54.5 percent  with 137,296 votes. Alvarez trailed by 9 percent, with 45.5 percent and 114,478 votes. Faulconer maintained a strong lead over his rival from the very first vote count at 8 p.m.

Faulconer is expected to be sworn in as San Diego’s mayor March 3. He will serve the nearly three years remaining in the term of disgraced ex-Mayor Bob Filner, who was beset by scandal when he left office Aug. 30, barely nine months into his term. Faulconer, 46, will replace interim Mayor Todd Gloria.

“Together, you have sent a very strong message — not only here in San Diego but throughout our region — that this city is going to have an independent leader, this city is going to stand up and work together to bring us all together,” Faulconer told jubilant supporters at the U.S. Grant Hotel.

Faulconer said he would continue fiscal reforms instituted by Jerry Sanders, Filner’s predecessor, and plow the savings back into the city’s neighborhoods.

“So tonight, our message to every single San Diego neighborhood, we will invest where we need to help,” Faulconer said. “We will get our city back on track on the services that San Diegans expect, and that they deserve.”

Alvarez, 33, thanked his supporters at an Election Night event at the San Diego Public Market and said the campaign came a long way in five months.

“In fact, a lot of people had no idea who David Alvarez was — they know who David Alvarez is tonight,” he said. “We have come really, really far.”

Without mentioning his opponent by name, Alvarez said they would move the city forward because of their shared love for San Diego, without the campaign rhetoric of business against labor, or north of Interstate 8 versus south of I-8.

An Alvarez victory would have given San Diego its first Latino mayor and the second straight for Democrats in the traditionally conservative city. He picked up last-minute endorsements from fellow Democrats President Barack Obama and Gov. Jerry Brown. He was also supported by organized labor and other Democratic officials.

Faulconer opened with a 13 percentage point lead in the initial count of absentee ballots and only gave away a small portion of the margin as votes came in from the city’s polling places. Most pre-election polls showed him either with a small lead or a statistical dead heat.

Faulconer, who is married and has two school-aged children, will give up his District 2 City Council seat when he is inaugurated, which will reduce the Republican minority from 5-4 to 5-3 on the technically nonpartisan body.

His replacement will be appointed by the City Council, and Gloria said last week a Democrat would be considered. Such an appointee would give the Democrats a veto-proof 6-3 edge.

Residents in Solana Beach also went to the polls Tuesday to decide whether special use permits should be issued for private events at the Fletcher Cove Community Center. The ballot measure was approved by 52-48 percent margin, 1,720 yes votes to 1,523 no votes.

SAN DIEGO — The polls closed Tuesday at 8 p.m. and the first vote counts showed Kevin Faulconer with a 13-point lead over David Alvarez to  replace former San Diego Mayor Bob Filner.

GET REAL-TIME ELECTION RESULTS NOW!

With less than 2 percent of the vote counted, Falconer had 56.6 percent  with 94,354 votes. Alvarez trailed with 43.36 percent and 72,245 votes.

Though neither candidate was a clear favorite to win the race, Faulconer was expected to hold a lead in the count of absentee ballots to be released just after 8 p.m. Registrar of Voters Michael Vu said about 170,000 mail-in ballots had been turned in as of midday.

The winner will be determined at the city’s almost 500 polling places. Vu projected a turnout of around 45-50 percent.

The first results from the precincts should begin coming in between 9:30 and 10 p.m., Vu said.

Residents in Solana Beach also went to the polls Tuesday to decide whether special use permits should be issued for private events at the Fletcher Cove Community Center. The ballot measure was passing by 54-46 percent, with 11 percent of the vote counted.

San Diego is deciding if David Alvarez or Kevin Faulconer will serve out the remaining three years of disgraced ex-Mayor Bob Filner’s term today. Get real-time election results of that race and Proposition B in Solana Beach starting after the polls close at 8 p.m.

Go to election results.

SAN DIEGO — Voters headed to the polls Tuesday to decide whether David Alvarez or Kevin Faulconer will replace former San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, who left office in disgrace Aug. 30, nearly three years before the end of his term.

Both councilmen finished in the top two of nearly a dozen candidates to replace Filner in a Nov. 19 special election, but neither man garnered more than 50 percent of the vote, resulting into Tuesday’s runoff.

Faulconer Alvarez

Kevin Faulconer and David Alvarez

Should Alvarez win, he would be the California border city’s first Latino mayor and his victory would spell a second straight mayoral win for Democrats in the traditionally conservative town.

Democrats currently hold a 5-4 majority on the technically nonpartisan City Council and the party is fielding two potentially strong candidates in GOP- held districts in elections later this year.

If Faulconer wins, he would regain control of the city’s top seat for the Republicans.

Alvarez picked up last-minute endorsements from President Barack Obama and Gov. Jerry Brown. He is also supported by organized labor and other Democratic officials.

Faulconer received strong backing from the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce and pro-business Lincoln Club of San Diego County. He’s also been endorsed by prominent religious leaders, including legendary San Diego homeless advocate, Father Joe Carroll.

Faulconer emphasized his experience as the senior member of the City Council and the need to continue fiscal reforms implemented under Filner’s immediate predecessor, Jerry Sanders, a Republican who now runs the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Alvarez, meanwhile, touted the need to increase funding for vital city services, such as libraries, police and fire protection, street repair and street light installation. He also campaigned on the need for job creation, more school support, making San Diego a more sustainable city and the need for a more open government.

Alvarez, 33, was born and raised in San Diego’s primarily Latino Barrio Logan neighborhood and was the first in his family to graduate from high school and college. He began his professional career in social services and education before entering politics, joining the City Council in 2010 as its District 8 representative. District 8 includes Barrio Logan, Golden Hill, Logan Heights, Otay Mesa, San Ysidro, Southcrest and the Tijuana River Valley.

The married father of one young daughter lives in Logan Heights and graduated from San Diego State University, as did Oxnard native Faulconer.

Faulconer, a 46-year-old Point Loma resident, is also married and has two school-aged children. He worked in public relations before joining the City Council in 2006 as a representative for District 2, which includes downtown, Bankers Hill, Little Italy, the Midway District, Mission Beach, Mission Hills, Ocean Beach, Old Town, Pacific Beach and Point Loma.

The latest poll, released Sunday, show the candidates in a virtual dead- heat, with Faulconer narrowly leading 47 percent to Alvarez’s 46 percent.

Though neither candidate was a clear favorite to win the race, Faulconer was expected to hold a lead in the count of absentee ballots to be released just after 8 p.m. Registrar of Voters Michael Vu said about 170,000 mail-in ballots had been turned in as of midday.

Those who have not turned in an absentee ballot can do so at any polling place, Vu said.

But the winner will be determined at the city’s almost 500 polling places. Vu projected a turnout of around 45-50 percent.

The first results from the precincts should begin coming in between 9:30 and 10 p.m., Vu said.

The National University System Institute for Policy Studies found that Democrats had returned more absentee ballots overall than Republicans. However, the portion of GOP voters who had done so was greater than the percentage of Democrats.

Vince Vasquez, author of the NUSIPR report, said the endorsement of Alvarez by the president could add to Election Day interest.

“Polling shows that Faulconer maintains a narrow lead in this election,” Vasquez said. “Alvarez will have to generate a higher Democratic turnout on Election Day in order to win. With Obama an unknown factor in this race, it may be a late evening for poll watchers.”

Vasquez also said more than 40,000 absentee ballots had been returned by voters not affiliated with the Democratic or Republican parties.

City Council President Todd Gloria, who has been serving as interim mayor since Filner’s resignation, said that unless problems arise, the new mayor will be seated March 3. Gloria declined to run for the permanent position and has since endorsed fellow Democrat, Alvarez.

Residents in Solana Beach were also going to the polls Tuesday to decide whether special use permits should be issued for private events at the Fletcher Cove Community Center.

SAN DIEGO – The two mayoral candidates took their campaigns to phone banks Monday and called voters as a last minute attempt to reach out before Tuesday’s campaign.

 

SAN DIEGO — As the candidates for San Diego mayor made their final pushes for votes, Councilman David Alvarez scored a list-minute endorsement Monday from Gov. Jerry Brown.

Jerry Brown“David Alvarez has been a leader in the community and on the City Council, fighting for innovative policies that will grow the economy and protect the environment,” Brown said. “He is the kind of mayor San Diego needs.”

Alvarez, who rode the trolley during the morning commute to seek votes, said he was “incredibly grateful” for the governor’s support and pledged to work with him to create a stronger middle class. He has received endorsements from numerous Democratic state officials.

“We’re really excited because it’s the last day,” Alvarez told CBS8. “We’re trying to get out the votes tomorrow, and it’s going to be a fantastic day for us.”

Councilmen Kevin Faulconer told the station that a lot work and energy goes into the last two days of a campaign, so he and his supporters will be knocking on doors and making phone calls. He and his mother held signs and waved at drivers during the morning commute.

A poll released Sunday showed Faulconer leading Alvarez 47 percent to 46 percent among likely voters. The SurveyUSA poll, conducted on behalf of 10News and U-T San Diego, had Faulconer up by 5 points two weeks ago.

Political observers have been expecting a close race that’s likely to be decided by turnout at the city’s polling places.

Last week, the National University System Institute for Policy Studies found that Republicans were returning their mail ballots at a faster rate than Democrats, likely giving Faulconer the edge when the first round of results are released just after 8 p.m. Tuesday.

In the Nov. 19 special election, Alvarez was in third place when absentee ballots were counted. However, when votes from the polling places came in, he edged out former Assemblyman Nathan Fletcher for a spot on the runoff ballot.

Tuesday’s winner will serve out the nearly three years remaining in the term of Bob Filner.

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