Excessive heat warning in effect until Saturday night

SAN DIEGO -- Blistering heat and near-record temperatures will continue across San Diego County this weekend, the National Weather Service said.

Most of the county remains under an excessive heat warning until 10 p.m. Saturday evening after being extended twice, while the mountains and beaches remain under a less serious heat advisory during the same period.

FOX 5 Forecast

High temperatures Saturday will be 88 to 93 degrees at the beaches ... 97 to 102 inland ... 93 to 103 in the western valleys ... 93 to 98 near the foothills ... 83 to 91 in the mountains and 96 to 101 in the deserts.

It's hot, hot, hot! How are you enjoying your long weekend? // 📷: @would_u

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Rain and thunderstorms that pummeled Riverside and Lake Elsinore on Thursday missed San Diego County, but San Diegans might not be so lucky over the weekend, meteorologists said.

Tropical Storm Lidia, which has moved over the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula, is expected to send moisture to the north starting Saturday night and lasting through Monday.

Meteorologists forecast a 50 percent chance of rain Sunday in the mountains and deserts and a 40 percent chance of rain from the foothills to the beaches. But before the rain, which is expected to cool temperatures down several degrees, San Diegans must brace for more record-breaking high temperatures.

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"Ahead of the tropical moisture will be continued blazing heat across inland areas ... today," the NWS said. "In fact, today looks as hot as what was felt yesterday, and even hotter at some locales."

The NWS reminded residents that during an excessive heat warning, "persons working outdoors or those without access to adequate air conditioning will be more likely to experience heat-related illness, such as heat exhaustion. Some heat-related illnesses are serious enough to require hospitalization and could become fatal if left untreated."

Residents also should never leave children, seniors or pets unattended in cars; drink more water than usual and avoid alcohol, sugar and caffeine; wear light-colored clothing and a wide-brimmed hat outdoors to keep the head and body cooler; and take frequent rest breaks in shaded or air-conditioned environments, forecasters said.