Suicide note shows Torrey Pines student planned fatal confrontation, police say

SAN DIEGO – A 15-year-old who died after San Diego police officers shot him in the Torrey Pines High School parking lot on Saturday left a suicide note.

The teen, who was armed with a BB gun, was shot after he pointed the gun at police officers who were sent to the school in response to a 911 call. Authorities have withheld the name of the teen.

During the boy's autopsy, investigators found a suicide note in his jacket pocket, according to San Diego police.

"The note indicates the (boy) planned the incident that resulted in his death,'' SDPD Lt. Mike Holden said.

Investigators believe the boy called 911 himself and told police to check on an unarmed juvenile in the school parking lot.

When Officers Gilbert Flores and Kai Johnson arrived at the school, they spotted the teen in the front parking lot. As they approached, he pulled what appeared to be a firearm from his waistband and pointed it at one of them, ignoring orders to drop the weapon, Holden said.  As the boy began to advance on one of the lawmen, both of them opened fire. Paramedics took the teen to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Following the shooting, investigators determined that the boy's gun was a BB pistol.

It was not known if the boy's note explained why he wanted police to kill him.

Flores, a 28-year veteran of the San Diego Police Department, and Johnson, who has been with the SDPD for four years, have been placed on desk duty pending completion of investigations in the case.

On the school's Facebook page, Principal Rob Coppo wrote that the aftermath of the boy's death "will be challenging for us all.''

"As a community, we will need to support each other and unite as a ... family,'' Coppo stated.

In a statement to FOX 5 on Sunday,  the teen's mother said her family was "mourning the loss of a loving and wonderful young man. We ask that you respect our privacy as we remember him and all he meant to us.''

Despite the circumstances, which suggested that the shooting might have been an instance of so-called "suicide by cop," authorities have not designating it as such.

An Arizona civil rights activist on Sunday called on the San Diego Police Department to release the body camera video from the fatal shooting.

"People are shocked, angry, frightened, and already questioning why body-camera footage isn't being made available as soon as possible," Maupin said in a statement distributed to reporters. "This should not happen in America and people want to know if what happened had to happen or if this unfortunate result was in any way avoidable."

On the school's Facebook page, Principal Rob Coppo wrote that the aftermath of the boy's death "will be challenging for us all."

"As a community, we will need to support each other and unite as a ... family," Coppo stated.