1st of 2 year-end storms douses San Diego

SAN DIEGO -- Rain began falling in parts of San Diego County Friday as the first of two winter storms that will fill the final days of 2016 with chilly temperatures, rain, mountain snow and gusty wind moved into the region.

As of 10:15 a.m., low air pressure had delivered .16 of an inch of rain in Point Loma; .11 in San Onofre; .08 at Fashion Valley; .05 in Carlsbad and Mission Valley; .04 in Bonsall, Camp Pendleton, La Jolla and Oceanside; .03 in Kearny Mesa; .02 in Elfin Forest, Rancho Bernardo, and at Lindbergh Field and Montgomery Field, according to the National Weather Service.

FOLLOW THE STORM ON LIVE DOPPLER RADAR

Automated gauges captured lesser amounts elsewhere along the coast and in the valleys, but no rain was yet reported in the mountains or deserts.

Forecasters said passing showers and a slight chance of thunderstorms likely would continue throughout the day.

Rain may linger in some areas overnight ahead of a stronger, colder storm set to move into the region from the northwest on Saturday.

A winter weather advisory for the mountains will extend from 4 p.m. Saturday to 3 a.m. on New Year's Day.

The two storms are expected to drop .62 of an inch of rain in Borrego Springs; .94 in San Diego; 1.01 inches in Oceanside; 1.06 in the Miramar area; 1.09 in Escondido; 1.18 in Ramona; 1.27 in Alpine; 1.61 on Palomar Mountain; 1.85 on Mount Laguna; and 1.87 in Julian, according to the weather service.

The snow level is expected to drop to around 4,000 Saturday night. Locales with altitudes of 4,000 to 5,000 could get up to 3 inches of snow, areas from 5,000 to 6,000 feet could see 5 to 10 inches and higher mountain peaks may get up to a foot.

Forecasters warned that hazardous travel conditions and slick roads will be possible, especially in the mountains New Year's Eve.

Winds of 20 to 30 miles per hour with gusts to 50 mph are also expected in some mountain locales, according to the NWS.

The storm was expected to dissipate late Saturday night, but windy conditions will likely persist into the new year in the mountains and deserts, forecasters said.