U.S. couple confirmed killed in Brussels attacks

Two siblings flying to New York. A Peruvian chef. A Belgian law student.

These are some of the dead and missing in Tuesday’s terror attacks in Brussels.

At least 28 people were killed and 300 wounded in Tuesday’s attacks at the Brussels Airport and in the subway, authorities said. The widely reported death toll of 31 was revised Saturday after authorities revealed the earlier tally included the three suicide attackers.

The victims span 40 nationalities. Two Americans were among the dead, and 14 others were wounded, U.S. President Barack Obama said Saturday. He did not identify them.

France confirmed that one of its citizens was dead and 12 were wounded without providing details. China also said a citizen had died, but it was unclear if the victim, identified only by the surname Deng by the Chinese Embassy in Belgium, was among the 28 already reported dead.

“We express deep condolences over the death of our Chinese compatriot and strong condemnation on the criminal act of the terrorists,” an embassy statement said.

Meanwhile, the stories of many of the victims are emerging as loved ones struggle to know more.

Deceased

Justin and Stephanie Shults

Justin and Stephanie Shults were killed at the airport, her mother, Carolyn Moore, told CNN.

“They are in heaven,” Moore said.

Justin Shults’ employer, CLARCOR, said in a statement: “We grieve with his family and continue to offer our support as they mourn this unimaginable loss. Justin has been an integral member of our global financial team since May of 2012. … He will be remembered by his CLARCOR community as an intelligent, kind and loyal friend and employee. Justin will be greatly missed by those who knew him.”

The couple from Tennessee had lived in Belgium since 2014. They were dropping off Moore for a flight to the United States.

Moore, who was just about to walk through security, was knocked over by one of the explosions. She is now having trouble hearing in one ear.

The Shults were working in Brussels and were expected to move back to the United States in 2017.

Patricia Rizzo

The Italian Foreign Ministry confirmed Rizzo’s death Friday.

A cousin said Rizzo, an Italian citizen, was at the Maelbeek metro station. Massimo Leonora wrote on Facebook: “Dear friends, first of all thank you for your support, your aid and that of the various countries… Unfortunately Patricia is no longer among us. It’s hard.”

Italian media reported that Rizzo’s grandparents, who are from the Sicilian province of Enna, moved to Brussels many years ago to work and the family stayed in Belgium.

Rizzo’s parents had submitted DNA samples to help identify their daughter, Italian media said.

Adelma Marina Tapia Ruiz

She had lived in Belgium for six years. Originally from Peru, the 37-year-old, her husband and twin 4-year-old daughters waited to board a flight to New York for an Easter holiday family reunion, according to Peruvian media and CNN en Español.

The daughters and husband left the boarding area for a moment. And in that moment, a bomb exploded.

Her family survived. One of the girls injured her arm but is doing better, her uncle Fernando Tapia told Peruvian media.

Tapia told CNN that his half sister was a chef and worked with the Peruvian Consulate in Brussels to promote Peruvian food.

She met her husband in 2005 during a tourist trip in Puno, Peru. She moved to Belgium with him.

“We never imagined we were going to have to suffer something like this: my sister killed in an inhumane, terrorist act,” Tapia said. “She had a happy marriage. She loved her husband, her family life and the girls. She left the country to live abroad in search of a better life and found death in such an inexplicable way. It’s something we will never understand.”

Leopold Hecht

The Belgian law student died in the attack, his school, Universite Saint-Louis Bruxelles, said in a statement.

Olivier Delespesse

Delespesse was killed in the metro explosion, according to his employer, La Federation Wallonie-Bruxelles, a government ministry serving Francophone Brussels and Wallonia.

“I wanted to pay tribute to him and to his family and to all the other victims,” said colleague Olivier Dradin in a Facebook tribute.

Others posted drawings of a cartoon man, weeping, a broken red heart on the ground. A friend wrote, “Courage to his family, his friends, his colleagues.”

“May his soul rest in peace,” another posted.

David Dixon

The British Foreign Office confirmed Dixon died in the attacks but provided no details.

‘I am deeply saddened to hear David Dixon was killed in the Brussels attacks,” British Prime Minister David Cameron tweeted Friday. “My thoughts and prayers are with his friends and family.”

Dixon’s family believes he died in the explosion at the Maelbeek metro station.

An aunt sent Dixon a text message after the airport attack, and he replied soon after he was fine, Dixon’s longtime partner, Charlotte Sutcliffe, told The Times of London.

“He obviously took the train with the bomb, otherwise he would have got to his office,” Sutcliffe told The Times.

In a statement provided by the Foreign Office, the family said: “This morning we received the most terrible and devastating news about our beloved David. At this most painful time our family would gratefully appreciate it if we could be left alone to grieve in private.”

Dixon and Sutcliffe have a son. “I just want him to come home,” she had said of Dixon.

Sascha and Alexander Pinczowski

The family of the Dutch siblings missing since the blasts confirmed Friday that the brother and sister had died.

“We received confirmation this morning from Belgian authorities and the Dutch Embassy of the positive identification of the remains of Alexander and Sascha,” the family said in a statement. “We are grateful to have closure on this tragic situation, and are thankful for the thoughts and prayers from all. The family is in the process of making arrangements.”

The siblings were in the Delta Air Lines ticket line at the airport to check in for their flight to New York when the bombs went off. Alexander was talking to his mother on the phone when the line went dead, Jim Cain, a former U.S. ambassador to Denmark, told CNN.

“The family would like to thank the Dutch Embassy and Delta Airlines for all of their support in our search in Brussels,” the family said in an earlier statement. “We especially thank all of our friends and family, across two continents, for their expressions of love, support and prayers for Sascha and Alex.”

Reacting to their deaths, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement, “Their lives were cut short by cowards who have chosen extremism and hate instead of peace and unity. On behalf of all New Yorkers, I extend our deepest prayers and condolences to the Pinczowski family, as well as all those who lost loved ones in Tuesday’s heartbreaking attacks.”

Bart Migom

Migom, 21, a Belgian national, was confirmed dead Friday, according to family members. A Belgian hospital notified his mother.

Migom was on his way to Athens, Georgia, the day of the attack at the Brussels Airport.

His girlfriend, Emily Eisenman, checked to make sure his train arrived at the airport at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday. It had.

His flight was scheduled to depart at 10:30 a.m.

“But I don’t think he ever made it,” she said.

Migom and Eisenman met last year on a health and fitness retreat in the United States. He and her brother were friends. The couple started dating on October 29. She remembers the exact date.

He was studying marketing at Howest University in Bruges, Belgium, Eisenman said, and was living with his mother, two brothers and sister.

He had booked his flight to visit her in the States.

“I’ve never been to Belgium,” she said.

Andre Adam 

Andre Adam, a former Belgian ambassador to the United States, died in the attack, according to Didier Vanderhasselt, a spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He declined further comment.

Adam was with his wife, Danielle, at the airport at the time of the attack, according to their daughter Gigi Adam.

Hours after the attack, she learned her mother was taken to a hospital in Flanders.

It’s unclear whether Danielle Adam survived the attack.

In a Facebook post, Gigi Adam remembered her father.

“He was a loving father and an adored grandfather,” she wrote. “He died protecting our mother during the bloody attacks in Zaventem. … His death has wounded us all forever. All his life he had worked towards the peaceful resolution of conflict in the world.”

His many diplomatic posts included his first assignment in Cuba in 1964 — which “led to his meeting our mother, the love of his life” — and a stint as Belgium’s representative to the United Nations in New York in 1997 to close out his career, according to his daughter.

“A cultured and cheerful man, my father was an esteemed diplomat,” she wrote.

Missing

Gilles Laurent

Laurent’s family believes he was at the metro station at the time of the attack. They haven’t heard from him since, his cousin wrote on Facebook.

Laurent is a sound engineer for film.

Raghavendran Ganesan

Raghavendran Ganesan, an Indian citizen and employee of Infosys, has been missing since the attacks, his brother said.

His brother wrote on Facebook that the Indian Embassy in Brussels is searching for him.

“We are coordinating with @IndEmbassyBru & local authorities to locate our employee in Brussels & are in touch with his family,” Infosys tweeted.

The Indian Embassy wrote on Twitter it “will leave no stone unturned” to find Ganesan.

Sabrina Esmael Fazal

Sabrina Esmael Fazal, 24, is missing. She took the metro to her university.

Jonathan Selemani, 25, has been scouring the city’s hospitals looking for his partner and mother of their 1-year-old child.

“I saw her in the morning, before she went to school, before she was leaving for class,” Selemani said. “Then when I learned the news I immediately started looking for her. I haven’t found her.

“I don’t know how I’m going to explain it to my son.”

Yves Cibuabua Cyombo

Cyombo was at the metro at the time of the attack and has not been seen since, his uncle told CNN. Cyombo is a student living in Brussels.

Before the attack he sent a text to his younger brother saying he was about to get on the metro at Maelbeek, the station that was targeted.

His family posted on Facebook urging anyone with information to get in touch.

“Please come back to us,” they said in the post, adding they believe in “miracles.”

Aline Bastin

Bastin’s family believes she was at the Maelbeek metro at the time of the attack, and they have not heard from her.

The 29-year-old lives in Brussels but grew up in Liege, Belgium, where her father is a physician, according to local media. Bastin is “a young woman full of life and always smiling,” friend Ken Charton posted on Facebook. He pleaded for information about her.

Loubna Lafquiri

Lafquiri is a physical education teacher at La Vertu School, an Islamic school in Brussels, according to Mohamed Allaf, the school’s co-founder.

Lafquiri is believed to have been at the Maelbeek metro.

“She was supposed to start at 9:45, but she didn’t show up. We started to worry, thought she was sick. We called and called, but there was no answer on her phone,” Allaf told CNN.

She was born in Brussels, and her parents are originally from Morocco. Lafquiri is married with three sons.

“She was an exceptional woman. She represented the true values of Islam with generosity and caring,” Allaf said.

He said her family spoke with officials at multiple hospitals and provided DNA samples in the hope of identifying Lafquiri.

Johanna Atlegrim

Atlegrim’s friends and family believe she was in the metro at the time of the attacks. The 31-year-old Swedish woman has lived in Brussels for many years.

She studies at Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts Visuels de La Cambre and is an illustrator, according to her Facebook page. Friends have described her as tall and thin with large eyes.

“The sweetest of all, help us find her,” Frederique Halbardier posted on Facebook.

Fabienne Vansteenkiste

Vansteenkiste was in the airport, her family has said on social media. The family are holding out hope but are prepared for the worst, Vansteenkiste’s daughter wrote on Facebook.

Vansteenkiste’s car is still at Brussels Airport, where she also works, her friend Marianne Coudere wrote on Facebook.

Janina Panasewicz

Panasewicz was on the metro about the time of the attacks, Anabelle Schatten wrote on Facebook.

Originally from Poland, she is described as having a scar from a recent thyroid surgery and was believed to be wearing black pants and a gray jacket.

Correction: An earlier version of this story misspelled Johanna Atlegrim’s name.