Help California wildfire victims

Magnitude-4.5 earthquake hits near Big Bear

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Aerial shots of Yucca fire as it heads in the direction of Big Bear Lake. Firefighters struggled with desert winds and blistering heat Thursday as they battled a 37,000–acre wildfire edging toward San Bernardino National Forest. The fire, ignited during the weekend by lightning, had destroyed 42 houses, 55 other buildings and 91 vehicles in and around this high desert community 100 miles east of Los Angeles, authorities said. (Photo by Don Kelsen/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

BIG BEAR, Calif. – An earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 4.5 struck near Big Bear on Wednesday morning, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The temblor hit at approximately 9:10 a.m. and had a depth of 7 miles, USGS reported. It was centered 7 miles south southeast of Big Bear Lake and 8 miles south of Big Bear City.

The epicenter was a little more than 3 miles northwest of the 11,503-foot San Gorgonio Mountain, which is Southern California’s highest peak. It was located some 4 1/2 miles northeast of the mountain community of Forest Falls.

Following the quake, USGS seismologist Lucy Jones tweeted that a magnitude-4.5 earthquake in the San Bernardino Mountains is “normal” earthquake activity in Southern California.

She added there was a slight chance of a larger earthquake. The tremor hit near the San Andreas Fault, and as a result, there was a “very very slight” chance of an earthquake along that fault, according to Jones.

Shortly after the temblor, San Bernardino County Supervisor Josie Gonzalez stated on Twitter that she felt approximately 20 seconds of shaking at the county’s Government Center.

KTLA viewers reported that they felt shaking in Moreno Valley, Riverside, Hemet, Yucaipa and Burbank.

A quake with a magnitude of 2.4 struck the same area four minutes after the initial temblor, according to USGS. It was followed at approximately 9:47 by a smaller one with a preliminary magnitude of 2.1.

There were no initial reports of damages or injuries.