Mountain lion found under LA home

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LOS ANGELES -- A well-known mountain lion known to live in Griffith Park was discovered hiding in the crawl space of a Los Feliz home Monday, but after unsuccessful efforts to coax him out, he apparently left on his own Tuesday morning, according to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

The mountain lion known as P-22 was captured on video hiding beneath a crawl space of a home in Los Feliz.

The mountain lion known as P-22 was captured on video hiding beneath a crawl space of a home in Los Feliz.

The mountain lion known as P-22 was captured on video hiding beneath a crawl space of a home in the 2700 block of Glendower Avenue. The 150-pound puma had apparently been hiding there  “for some time,” Officer Hoang Dinh of Los Angeles City Animal Control told KTLA Monday night.

“We don’t know how long, but he’s real casual … real comfortable,” he said.

Homeowners Jason and Paula Archinaco  discovered the mountain lion in the crawl space on Monday when their alarm technician came face-to-face with the famous puma. The technician exited the crawl space "white as a ghost," according to the homeowners.

Animal control officers shot tennis balls and non-lethal beanbags at the big cat and even tried poking him with a pole, but the animal wouldn't budge.  By Tuesday morning, however, the lion had vacated the premises.  Just before 9:30 a.m., state Department of Fish and Game officials tweeted that the cougar had "left the building." It wasn't immediately known where he went.

P-22 was first discovered and radio-collared more than three years ago, in March 2012. According to a federal park official, the mountain lion was born in the Santa Monica Mountains, but crossed two freeways — the 405 and 101 — in order to get to Griffith Park.