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City College students walk out of class in protest

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SAN DIEGO - Several hundred students walked out of classes at San Diego City College Tuesday and held their own version of a Ferguson protest.

Unlike some of the Ferguson protests, the students peacefully protested. It stemmed from other protests that happened nationally throughout several college campuses.

The group organized the gathering on social media with the message #HandsUpWalkOut.

“We started screaming, 'hands up, walk out,'" said student Luis Lopez. “Not only for Ferguson but for the 43 students missing in Mexico. I’m a minority in this country. When it happens to a brother on the other side of the country, it happens to us here.”

At exactly 1:01 p.m. students from across campus met in the quad area of building AH.

“We’re fighting for justice and transparency," said student Bianca Elisa Arellano. “I think there needs to be systemic change and it needs to be from the people.”

Several students broke out in a "die-in" demonstration in remembrance of Michael Brown and the many who have died during unjust circumstances, they said.

“Finally it looks like people are waking up, people are coming back and getting ready to stand up and demand the rights the same way they did in the 60’s," said Paul Alexander, a professor at City College who joined the students in protest. "I was proud to support the students because today they are actually acting upon the lessons they are taught in the classroom.”

The students plan to organize more protests in the coming weeks.

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7 comments

  • Leroy

    Maybe Holder and Obama want to comment why they are not going after Civil Right Violators and those that fund them?

    Anti-Riot Act

    The Chicago conspiracy trial defendants were the first individuals prosecuted under the anti-riot provisions that Congress incorporated in the Civil Rights Act of 1968. The U.S. House of Representatives in 1967 overwhelmingly passed a version of the anti-riot provision in response to the urban riots of that summer and assertions from some members of Congress that African-American political activists had instigated the violence. The Senate included the provision in an open housing bill, and although President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark did not support the anti-riot provision, the administration accepted it to secure passage of the civil rights measure.

    [Document Source: 82 Stat. 75.]

    2101. Riots

    (a) (1) Whoever travels in interstate or foreign commerce or uses any facility of interstate or foreign commerce or uses any facility of interstate or foreign commerce, including, but not limited to, the mail, telegraph, telephone, radio, or television, with intent –

    (A) to incite a riot; or (B) to organize, promote, encourage, participate in, or carry on a riot; or (C) to commit any act of violence in furtherance of a riot; or (D) to aid or abet any person in inciting or participating in or carrying on a riot or committing any act of violence in furtherance of a riot; and who either during the course of any such travel or use or thereafter performs or attempts to perform any other overt act for any purpose specified in subparagraph (A), (B), (C), or (D) of this paragraph shall be fined not more than $10,000, or imprisoned not more than five years, or both. (b) In any prosecution under this section, proof that a defendant engaged or attempted to engage in one or more of the overt acts described in subparagraph (A), (B), (C), or (D) of paragraph (1) of subsection (a) and (1) has traveled in interstate or foreign commerce, or (2) has use of or used any facility of interstate or foreign commerce, including but not limited to, mail, telegraph, telephone, radio, or television, to communicate with or broadcast to any person or group of persons prior to such overt acts, such travel or use shall be admissible proof to establish that such defendant traveled in or used such facility of interstate or foreign commerce.

  • Etime Soy

    “Finally it looks like people are waking up, people are coming back and getting ready to stand up and demand the rights the same way they did in the 60’s,” said Paul Alexander a professor at City College who joined the students in protest. “I was proud to support the students because today they are actually acting upon the lessons they are taught in the classroom.”

    WOW…our educational institutions have really gone down the toilet. What were they taught in the classroom Paul, that led to this mindless protest?

    • Jason Roberst

      You make a very valid argument when the bastion of higher learning “City College” has a walkout of 1 class of students that will un-doughtily uses their education to further the goals of corporate America (McDonalds) by demonstrating acts that could most unequivocally be proven to be incorrect, with the exception of the poor students in Mexico, and stand up for their rights. Bravo and I applaud your stand, and could I get a small order of fries with that.

    • JIM

      I agree. I just saw the movie, “Idiocracy.” It’s a science fiction comedy about the future. Idiots reproduce at a faster rate than intelligent people resulting in a world full of morons. The movie made me laugh, but when I see events like this l i realize “Idiocracy” is becoming a reality.

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