Oklahoma storm kills three chasers

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(CNN) — A group of men who devoted their lives to hunting powerful storms died in the middle of the chase.

Tim Samaras, his son Paul Samaras and Carl Young were killed Friday while following a tornado in El Reno, Oklahoma, relatives told CNN on Sunday. Their work tracking tornadoes was featured on the former Discovery Channel show “Storm Chasers.”

They were among at least nine people that state officials reported killed in storms that struck Oklahoma on Friday night. On Sunday, Oklahoma City Fire Department officials told CNN that searchers had found the bodies of as many as five additional victims, but state officials could not be immediately reached to confirm whether the statewide death toll had increased.

At the intersection where authorities said the three storm chasers were killed, crews hauled away a mangled white truck Sunday that had been crushed like a tin can. The metal frame of their storm-chasing vehicle was twisted almost beyond recognition. The windows had been smashed to bits.

Canadian County Undersheriff Chris West confirmed that three storm chasers had been killed but declined to provide additional details about the circumstances of their deaths.

“We also want to say that storm chasers and meteorologists and news stations, that’s part of the vital link in getting the word out to people so that they don’t become victims,” he said. “A lot of these individuals have dedicated many years of their lives to going out and assisting and tracking storms, and getting footage and putting themselves in harm’s way so they can educate the public to the destructive power of these storms.”

Friday’s tornado took a sudden turn that surprised many observers, CNN meteorologist Chad Myers said.

“It was a wobbler. And it was big. … I think the left-hand turn made a big difference on how this thing was chased as well and why people were killed and why people were injured in their vehicles,” he said. “A vehicle is not a place to be in any tornado, especially a big one like that, and those men doing their job, those field scientists out there doing their jobs, were killed in the process.”

Tim Samaras founded TWISTEX, the Tactical Weather Instrumented Sampling in Tornadoes Experiment, to help learn more about tornadoes and increase lead time for warnings, according to the official website.

In 2004, he told CNN that being near storms was part of the job.

“In order to get directly in the path, you have to be close,” he said.

“Actually I’m pretty focused on our safety, certainly, and I’m focused on getting the data and getting the right spot,” he said. “You only have one chance to do it.”

A dangerous job

“They all unfortunately passed away but doing what they loved,” Jim Samaras wrote in a statement posted on his brother’s Facebook page.

Myers, who also covered Friday’s storm in Oklahoma, said Tim Samaras was known for his attention to safety.

“There’s just no one safer than Tim. Tim, he would never put himself in danger,” Myers said. “He certainly wouldn’t put his son in danger.”

One of Samaras’ goals, Myers said, was collecting more data to help government officials.

“We all know that this is difficult and dangerous and sometimes things go wrong. But I think to portray Tim as just a chaser out for a thrill is just the wrong thing,” Myers said. “I just want people to know that Tim was a scientist. He was out there to put probes out there. He was out there to learn and understand and to make science more understandable. … We all go out there and we try to protect the public, but Tim was even one step higher.”

Samaras had received 18 grants from the National Geographic Society for his research, said Terry Garcia, the organization’s executive vice president of missions. In a written statement, he described Samaras’ studies of lightning as “pioneering.”

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